Letters
Regarding the letter titled "Do we really want more tourist dollars?" (Peninsula Clarion, May 24): The commercial fishery has not fished on early Kenai kings since 1978, the original Cook Inlet Management Plan. The escapement on that run of kings has been dumbed down to a "range" of 7,000 to 9,000 kings. This was done to promote in-river angler opportunity. One account states that guides average one fish per boat per day. Remember the hook and release debates? The late run kings remain robust however those kings are getting smaller. Nowadays when a 70-pounder is landed it is plastered on the front page of the paper. Mr. Johnson complains about mismanagement but I have been to the Kenai Airport in July. There is nowhere else in the world where boxes of cheap fish are stacked high and shipped out. The sport fishery is managed for opportunity while the commercial fishery is prosecuted according to escapements. Finally, if a derby can be held to raise funds to mitigate the same impact it creates, if this is the new age hypocrisy of in-river stewardship, then you get more of what you have now. The biologists only implement the allocations set forth by the board of fish. 052611 LETTERS 1 Peninsula Clarion Regarding the letter titled "Do we really want more tourist dollars?" (Peninsula Clarion, May 24): The commercial fishery has not fished on early Kenai kings since 1978, the original Cook Inlet Management Plan. The escapement on that run of kings has been dumbed down to a "range" of 7,000 to 9,000 kings. This was done to promote in-river angler opportunity. One account states that guides average one fish per boat per day. Remember the hook and release debates? The late run kings remain robust however those kings are getting smaller. Nowadays when a 70-pounder is landed it is plastered on the front page of the paper. Mr. Johnson complains about mismanagement but I have been to the Kenai Airport in July. There is nowhere else in the world where boxes of cheap fish are stacked high and shipped out. The sport fishery is managed for opportunity while the commercial fishery is prosecuted according to escapements. Finally, if a derby can be held to raise funds to mitigate the same impact it creates, if this is the new age hypocrisy of in-river stewardship, then you get more of what you have now. The biologists only implement the allocations set forth by the board of fish.
Thursday, May 26, 2011

Story last updated at 5/26/2011 - 1:02 pm

Sport fishery already managed for opportunity



Regarding the letter titled "Do we really want more tourist dollars?" (Peninsula Clarion, May 24): The commercial fishery has not fished on early Kenai kings since 1978, the original Cook Inlet Management Plan. The escapement on that run of kings has been dumbed down to a "range" of 7,000 to 9,000 kings. This was done to promote in-river angler opportunity. One account states that guides average one fish per boat per day. Remember the hook and release debates? The late run kings remain robust however those kings are getting smaller. Nowadays when a 70-pounder is landed it is plastered on the front page of the paper. Mr. Johnson complains about mismanagement but I have been to the Kenai Airport in July. There is nowhere else in the world where boxes of cheap fish are stacked high and shipped out. The sport fishery is managed for opportunity while the commercial fishery is prosecuted according to escapements. Finally, if a derby can be held to raise funds to mitigate the same impact it creates, if this is the new age hypocrisy of in-river stewardship, then you get more of what you have now. The biologists only implement the allocations set forth by the board of fish.

John McCombs, Ninilchik





THE REC GUIDE

WINTER ACTIVITIES

If you think the Kenai Peninsula is beautiful in the summer, you should see it when cloaked under a thick blanket of white with the aurora borealis rippling through the celestial canopy above.

BERRIES OF THE KENAI PENINSULA

Whether intentionally seeking berries for jellies and jams or just out for a casual hike, residents and visitors will find the 50-some varieties of wild berries in Alaska hard to resist.

COMMON SENSE SURVIVAL

There’s adventure and beauty in the wild country, but also an element of risk.



2010 Peninsula Clarion award winners

Best Education Reporting
1st Place – Dante Petri, “All under one roof

Suzan Nightingale Award: Best Columnist

2nd Place – Will Morrow, “Voices of the Clarion”

Best Sustained Coverage

3rd Place – Dante Petri, “Mt. Redoubt Eruption”

Best News Photo

3rd Place – M. Scott Moon, “Bear Rescue

Best Photo Portrait
3rd Place – M. Scott Moon, “Ear Gauger

Best Audio Slideshow
2nd Place – M. Scott Moon, “Learning to ski

Best Use of Story and Photos by a Journalist
2nd Place – Joseph Robertia, “Dipnet disaster averted

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