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After a long winter hibernation, bears are starting to be out and about -- and they are hungry -- says Alaska Department of Fish and Game Kenai area wildlife biologist Jeff Selinger. 052511 NEWS 1 Peninsula Clarion After a long winter hibernation, bears are starting to be out and about -- and they are hungry -- says Alaska Department of Fish and Game Kenai area wildlife biologist Jeff Selinger.
Wednesday, May 25, 2011

Story last updated at 5/25/2011 - 1:07 pm

Time to watch out for wildlife: Hungry bears, calving moose likely to be ornery



After a long winter hibernation, bears are starting to be out and about -- and they are hungry -- says Alaska Department of Fish and Game Kenai area wildlife biologist Jeff Selinger.

"They're going to be looking for easy food items to obtain, so it's a good time to make sure the bird feeders are down and any attractants that might get bears into your area are taken care of and minimized," Selinger said.

Freezers outside should be latched closed or placed inside an electric fence to keep the bears out as part of the normal precautions this time of year, he advised. If you are unsure about bear-proofing your property, Selinger says to call Fish and Game and they will come out to your property and provide suggestions on how to minimize your risks.

In addition to bears roaming around, moose calving season season is under way. Selinger believes this could cause a change in the cow's demeanor.

"The neighborhood moose who was once pretty mellow around people and dogs might be a little bit more agitated this time of year," Selinger said. "Those calves need every opportunity to make it into the population."

Residents should show more caution than usual around cows this time of year. Selinger said to make sure children are aware that the cows might be more violent than in past months, and to keep dogs tied up when not being supervised.

Cows are likely to leave their calves in open areas, such as residents' yards, and calves may be left alone for hours at a time while the cow searches for food, which can lead to people trying to move them, according to Selinger. He advises not to do so, and to contact the Fish and Game if a stray calf is in the area for an extended period of time.

Fish and Game can be reached at 907-262-9368.

Logan Tuttle can be reached at logan.tuttle@peninsulaclarion.com.





THE REC GUIDE

WINTER ACTIVITIES

If you think the Kenai Peninsula is beautiful in the summer, you should see it when cloaked under a thick blanket of white with the aurora borealis rippling through the celestial canopy above.

BERRIES OF THE KENAI PENINSULA

Whether intentionally seeking berries for jellies and jams or just out for a casual hike, residents and visitors will find the 50-some varieties of wild berries in Alaska hard to resist.

COMMON SENSE SURVIVAL

There’s adventure and beauty in the wild country, but also an element of risk.



2010 Peninsula Clarion award winners

Best Education Reporting
1st Place – Dante Petri, “All under one roof

Suzan Nightingale Award: Best Columnist

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Best News Photo

3rd Place – M. Scott Moon, “Bear Rescue

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Best Audio Slideshow
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Best Use of Story and Photos by a Journalist
2nd Place – Joseph Robertia, “Dipnet disaster averted

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